From a Therapist / Bullying Prevention

October is National Bullying Prevention Month.  One out of every five students report being the victim of bullying.  Bullying is defined as “intentional behavior that hurts, harms or humiliates a student, either physically or emotionally”.  Bullying can happen at school, in the community or online.  Bullying is not about conflict, it is about power and control.  Kids and adults who bully often use their power, such as physical strength, embarrassing information or popularity to control or harm others.

Bullying Statistics

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From a Therapist / The Art of a Relationship

It has been my experience in counseling couples that the problems they incur are less about in-laws, money, or sex and more about poor communication and the expectations they expect of the other person.  When couples come in for therapy I hear a lot of “I do not understand why she does not do things like I do, my way is the right way”.  “ Why can’t he know what my needs are without me having to tell him all the time?”  Oh, if people would only do what we want them too then everyone would be happy, right?

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From a Therapist / Back to School Tips for Parents: How to Deal with Bullying

The school year is starting and parents hope for a successful year for their child, both academically and socially.  But what do you do if your Child is the target of a Bully?  There are several things you can do to both support and guide your child.  First let’s take a look at what bullying is.  Bullying is:

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From a Therapist / Bullying

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What is Bullying?

  • Use of superior strength or influence to intimidate someone, usually to get them to do what one wants
  • Includes force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others
  • May be habitual and involve an imbalance of power
  • May be repeated towards victims

Types of bullying:

  • Indirect
  • Verbal
  • Physical
  • Cyber

Indirect bullying:

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From a Therapist / Depression in Children & Toddlers

 How can you tell if your child is sad, going through a phase or depressed?  If your child has shown an increase in difficulty at home or school, is going through a life changing event (like a divorce) or has had sadness that has lasted more than two weeks you will want to review these symptoms of depression. Symptoms of depression in children include:  

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From a Therapist / Anger

Anger is a feeling or emotion that ranges from mild irritation to intense fury or rage.  Anger is a natural response to those situations where we:

  • Feel threatened
  • Believe harm will come to us
  •  Believe another person has unnecessarily wronged us 
  • Feel another person, like a child or someone close to us is being threatened or harmed 

Anger can result from frustration when our needs, desires, or goals are not being met.  When we become angry, we may lose our patience and act aggressively, impulsively, or violently. 

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From a Therapist / Self-Injury

Self injury is when someone is performing deliberate and repetitive acts of physical harm to their own bodies. 

Types of self harm include:

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From a Therapist / Dealing with Holiday Stress

Oftentimes the holidays will bring about a certain level of unwanted stress in our lives. If not dealt with in an effective and healthy way this stress and depression can often ruin our holidays and impact our health. Being realistic, planning ahead and seeking support from others can help ward off stress and depression.

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From a Therapist / Separation Anxiety in Children

At this time of year many children are making the transition from a fun filled summer to the excitement of a new school year. Having some anxiety and apprehension about a new situation is part of their normal development and with understanding and patience parents can help children build coping skills and their anxiety can be relieved.

However, some children’s anxiety is so intense that it becomes a separation anxiety disorder. These children’s fears keep them from normal activities. Here are some examples:

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From a Therapist / Does My Child Need Therapy?

There are a number of factors in determining the appropriateness of treatment.

1. Is this emotional distress disrupting daily functioning, threatening to overwhelm the child or interfere with age-appropriate emotional development?

For example, parental divorce is an emotionally upsetting experience that children react to in a variety of ways. If a child's reaction lasts longer than a month and is prevalent in other settings besides home, this indicates that normal functioning has become disrupted.

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Family / Relationship Issues

Despite their vital importance in our lives, relationships can be very difficult to manage

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD/ADD)

Includes a combination of persistent problems, such as difficulty sustaining attention, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior

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Substance Use / Alcohol Addiction

When a person succumbs to the grip of an addiction, it is extremely difficult to quit on their own

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